P441 ORACLE 441 Mon12 Oct C4 1750:03 4-Tel         Sir Godfrey Kneller, a student of Rembrandt, was appointed Court Painter to J—les II in 1691. His hundreds of portraits reduce his sittdrs (as they evidently wished) to bewigged and unsmiling ciphers, expressing little more than their wealth and status. Mould compares Kneller's and William Hogarth's portraits of Thomas Coram, showing how Hogarth's much more humane depiction also illustrates his own theory of beauty.  2/3 Next Feature Take 4 Shelf Life Facts
P441 ORACLE 441 Mon12 Oct C4 1751:02  4-Tel         8.00pm WEDNESDAY Changing Faces is a history of the British face presented by art expert Philip Mould. The fourth programme in the series, A Face to Order, looks at the Augustan age, the eighteenth century, a period of great affluence and comparative stability. Portraits as status symbols were very popular, and painters such as Sir Godfrey Kneller, Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough worked flat out to satisfy the demand.  1/3 Next Feature Take 4 Shelf Life Facts
P441 ORACLE 441 Mon12 Oct C4 1750:04 4-Tel         The other painters discussed in this edition are Arthur Devis, a Midlands artist whose patrons were mainly middle class landowners, the flamboyant Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough Gainsborough, who began stu$xhng art in London at the age of 13, emerges as the greatest of them all. Even the most aristocratic of his portraits are transformed by his love of nature - the sitter finally becomes the landscape. By Chris Stox  3/3 Next Feature Take 4 Shelf Life Facts