P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:09/50 |B220121A|a17MacHis7|i10TEXT|m10|s÷n1÷e TELEVION MAIIN G HIS NPY: THE TUDORS A by thf BBC at the rdquest of the School Broadcasting CUFK gdom Age 11-14. BBC 2 0dsday 9.52 10 day 9 00-10.12 am SE HD P ODUCERJ Sheppard ############################## ######################################## #### CON DNTS PT HE GREAT HOUSE 1 Marah ontent sources 3 March  THEVICARSOFHE SSLE 8 March  1 0 March THE BEGG ARS ARE COMING 11 March  17 March  MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS 22 Marc h 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:00/00 |B220321A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m36D8|s÷n1÷ eachers wishing to  Elds should writd to Jill Sheppard, BBC Schools dlevision, Villiers House, The Broadway, Ealing, London W5 2PA. ## ######################################## ################################ THEGR FAT HOUSE 1st, 3r d March PAMP historical writer ###################### ######################################## ############ AIMS ctive work' into the physical devdlopmdn j of T life-styles of the people who lived and worked in thfm.  M 1 - BEFOREDHEP FFPAM ME  manor house; pantry (from Fr pdin);  tdry (from Fr bouteille); sglar; dais; h eraldic emblem; ante-room. THEPOGRAMM E The programme concentratfs on thf dev elopment of one house, Haddon Hall, 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:00/00 |B220421A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m3A43|s÷n1÷ ein DerbysHhpe. I gavd way to semi-fortified houses, whic h were G Hall with the Chtchen and storage rooms on one side, and the lord's solar on the othfr In thd earliest timds,  the household lived, ate and slept in th e Great Hall. he presentdr, Richard Bu rrows thdn explores the Great Hall and the  qt from physical documentation and  nce how the work of the kitchdn staff wa s orgafHsed, how food was  ooked, what an important role herbs play ed in cooking and  s were sdrvdd He shows us how under th e tudors the  wo rooms: thd Great Chambdr for formal d ining  M with its big, new glazed windowsN He  hd housdhold were given their own 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:01/22 |B220521A<—17MakHis7 h14TEXT|m3DAE eodgings' and bed-rooms were added for thd family, and co-ldnts on the  in the kind of furFhturd that was usdd. FE lizabethan additions to thd house,  as real stairs dfcorativd plaster work, and the Long Gallery E and  ory of Dorothy Vernon's elopdment. SOU RCES USED DHH PLACES TO VISI AF$FR THE P NBRAMME H don Hall, near Bakewell, Derbys—ire: ope n 1st April or Easter to end of S r, 11.00 am to 6N00 pm daily except Sund ays and Mondays Also SA May, June and Septembdr. Enq0iries: Ba kewell (062 981)  BC hich housfs the tombs of Dorothy and Joh n Manners. TTG tdor House Museum, Southampton: opdn 10N00 a m to TF d Monday), Saturd!8 10.00am to 4.00 pm, Sunday 2N00 pm to 5N00 pm Enq!hpies|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:01/41 |B220621A|a17MakHis7\h14TEXT|m41119|s÷n1 ÷e: Southampton (0703) 224216 BACKGN ND INFORMATION HE GREAT HALL was the c ore of the typical medieval house; a dou ble height   w windows, so that it could not easily be attacked Orichnally, it would  a cdntral hdarth on the floor with smo ke escaping thro1bh a hole  —e roofN Later, scre—ns were added acro ss thd end nearest  , to afford protection against thf draug ht. FH hangings, trestle tables and benchds. A fter meals the trestle could be easily s tacked away to h—"d room for  r entertaiFDdntsN Many great halls have minstrels' galleries,  M 2 - H was played on formal occasions, or to an nounce the arrival of  servants carrxhng the dishes which w|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:02/10 |B220721A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m41483|s÷n1 ÷eere to be sfrved. E hall ceasfd to be the main centre for t hf household,  r grfat or festivf occasions, such as Ch ristmas. T o two rooms, with the one above (the Gre at C dining and entertainment. Although  ll grand, such chambers were warmer and rather more privatf than the  en. THEKITCHENAREANT chen was often built, as in Haddon, as separate building, for protection again st fireN In the middle ages,  no root crops with which to feed cattle during the winter, so  off and salted down. Joints and poultry were roasted on  ireN Many kitchens had bake-ovens for b read or NT lt in the thickness of the wallN A bund le 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:02/34 |B220821A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m417ED|s÷n1 ÷eideN Once they had burnt out, and the  ed aside, and in went the cooUhng,  was done when the oven cooled downN Fl our for baking was kept in  odfn containers with locks on to guard a gainst theftN Bread  ored in dole-chestsN Their often intric ate decorations  air in, and stopped the bread going mou ldy. O h connected the kitchen to the Great H l were a BUTTERY, where the butler kept ale and sometimes wine (though  wine may often havf been kfpt in cellars ); and a PANTRY, where  and platters were kept. R e Tudor period meals were servfd with gr eat formality, with  ourses of the main meal being brought in , in  T oom or BED CHAMBER became common in |c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:02/57 |B220921A ÷ethe mid sixteenth century,  ooms were no longer bed-sitting rooms, b ut mainly used for NW beds were strung with cords which suppor ted feather  sters hung with0embroidered curtains, to AH bed-chambers had the comfort   should the occupant wish to take a bath , hf would use a woodfn tub  the fire. THELONGGALLERYG originated as covered walks, sometimes o pfn  osfdN At first they were probably no  re than protected ways leading from one place to anotherN Later, their  became formalised as a place to take ex ercise under cover, or to  make music, and hold masques or ballsN Portraits began to  to give the family something to look as at as they T
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:03/20 |B220A21A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m41EC1|s÷n1 ÷e to improvf as well as commemorate. P ictures of KQR Emperors, were supposed to inspire the n-looker to copy thfir virtufs. THEGAR DENN Even when the need to wall in the house for security had T dfns were stil enclosed by a wall or a h edgeL so the  l and geometricN Vegetables and herbs ( for  e planted in narrow, raised beds,  made weeding easy and improved the drain ageN Grand gardens often  ilings around square of turf or camomile lawns, or flower NF preciated not only for their appearance, but for use  eetsN Arbours - sitting places M were p lanted  ysuckleN Plants were believed to have ymbolic meaningsN For instance, the ros e was thf symbol of love for the V
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:03/43 |B220B21A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m4222B|s÷n1 ÷egin Mary M and later the virgin Queen Elizabfth, for the emblem of the  M 3 - H use of Tudor was a rosef Apples, pfars and cherrifs were grown, and in T mes, lesser known fruits such as medlars , figs, and quincesN A E han garden feature was the knot M a bed designed in a  c emblem, or initials of the ownbqs, and formed  BUILDINGTECHNIQUESM s were built of wood or stone  on which material was most ea3hly availa ble locallyN The use of  e-introduced until the fourteenth centur y, when FleUhsh  ported. A century later brick-making wa s widely NUT this material, well suited to resist the  hygienic and fireMproof than wood, 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:04/05 |B220C21A ÷eand easier to work than stone, became very popularL and was used to great  rative effect. Glass began to be made f or church windows in the later  es but because of its expence was not wi dely used in houses until  centuryN Even then it could only be blo wn and flattened to N Before that windows might have shutter s, or be  keep out the draughtsN Wooden staircas es,  the sixteenth century, and modelled  ster ceilings under Elizabfth; but the d udor period was one in which  tion was givfn to decoration M painted c eilings, carved   ved in stone or wood, and finally neo-cl assical IF rance. THEMAINBUILDERSATHADDONN Sir Richard Vernon IV (1314-1400) built the Great Hall, kitchen, bakehouse, |c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:04/29 |B220D21A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m428FF|s÷n1 ÷epantry, solar and original tower. S Henry Vernon (1452-1567) converted the s olar into a Great Chamber and  ompleted the second courtyard and began the North West Tower. SGV 1517-1567) added the lodgings, finHshed the tower, put M -window, and altered the kitchen area. S ir John Manners (1367-1611) reMdecfrated the Great Chamber and modified L Gallery. FOLLOUPWORKFORTHECLAS S L way to school. ghat can you guess  the occupants just from seeing the outs ide? IMN t can you work out about British people and their way of life from the things th ey have in their homes?  r houses like Haddon havf walls round th em in the  se of the courtyard? Why did maf8 Great H
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:04/52 |B220E21A ÷edows? D l Great Hall, solar, kitchen, pantry, an d M and the dais. M life in the Great Hall during the medie val  F pment ssed in the kitchenN How does it differ   - 4 - T C ps (traditionally the last meat meal bef ore Lent)  ak, leg of lamb or pork, cut into 8  collops' about 2 inches by 4 (5 cm by 10 ), by 1/2 an inch (1.5 cm)   oz (25g) seasoned flour  hly ground pepper   12oz (350g) mushrooms, sliced  poons cornflour  wn stock or stock made with a beef cube (serves four) D collops in seasoned flourN Lightly |c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:05/14 |B220F21A|a17MakHis7|i14TEXT|m42FD3|s÷n1 ÷efry the  in a casseroleN Fry the collops in the same  . Lay them on the musdrooms and N Make a paste with the cornflour and 2 tablespoons of stockN Heat  g stock, stir in the paste, and stir ove r a medium heat till  s. Pour into the casserole, cover close ly, and cook in  c 350f) M gas mark 4, for 45 minutes S rvf with leeks or cabbage, and redcurren t felly. I boy or wench, and describe your day. Makf two lists, one of things bought f or the housfhold, one of things  grown by the household. M of herbs commonly used in cooking today. In Tudor times,  rden was complete unless it had at least 40 hfrbs. F f some of the herbs the Tudors used |c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:05/38 |B221021A@XT|m4333D|s÷n1 ÷deg  the floor, pinks (gillyflowers) to  ur wine mint and lavender to repfl insf cts, angelica as an eye drop,  ach achd Are any hdrbs  y today? FT ealsN T—dn act out thd way in which thd GHNA e of you could be servants,  d, somf sdnior members of thf household who played particular  ssion and some minstrels   ou are a lord or lady holding a formal T udor dinnerN Gho w—ll 8ou invitd? gher e will you seat your gudsts# How maf8 c ourses will you  W he bobs of particular servants or rdtain ers# Ghat  e during and after the meal? A as knot gardens, the $rdors were very f ond of designing mazes. D
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:06/23 |B221221ADXT|m43A11|s÷n1 ÷eily, or politicians.  Ghy were wood and stone still often usdd to build Tud or houses? g—y do  me fashionable? Wdy was glass incre rhn £ly usdd in  main differences between a medieval and T F out abo0t T udor pastimes G—at indoor game1 wdre p layed eg HBNA thdy still playdd to$—x> g—at o1tdoor games similar to ours were played In w hat ways havd thdse games changed? T he Tudor lady of the housd had an evdn m ore important bob at home than  oday: shd was usually res0n,rhble for th e overall running of the  g to accounts, checAhng thd gapden, maki ng medicines,  ap and toiletrids, instructing thd young er   all hangings making clothes, and so  according to how well-off the ho5rd|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:06/40 |B221321A|a17MakHis7@XT|m43D7B|£÷n1 ÷dhold wasN Choose one girl to be  ady, and the rest to bd members gd the h ousehold or children 'The  gavd them their instructions for thd da y.  n Tudor times: a proper bath? Central dati.f> Modern food? Proper soap and s hampoo? Really clean clothes? T tapds? Expl!hl w(8. D xfur ow n modern house, but along tdor lines of thoug—t: that @D as livdd there a long time; to show they havd  ); to demonstrate fashionable ideas  t tastd; or to incorporate the latest mo dern cnF6fnidncesN G—at  you build in and why? TM f London and thd Geffrye Musdum (among o thers) have tdor NI r, visit a musdum w(hch (—2 such a dis l ay; draw thd  resting, and explain why. V
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:07/00 |B221421A440E5|s÷n1 ÷e9f1r nearest medievad or Tudor 'statel y home', if there is one. H ffer in basacs from the one seen in the prog—ammd? Or, UT mdrchant's or artisan's houseN g—at do es it havd M nder Tudor housds? How is it different? Or,  h are based on the ancient patternN Can  edieval manor ho5rf in their  ay-out, in the way the dining and cooA—n g areas are organised,  way in wHich the student's rooms are arranged?  who built the house or founded the   - 6 - CLASS @ADING TE n ountry HouseL Marjorie Reevfs (Then & T—fre Lo.fl—n  PLACESTOVISIT CLMHA ton DHHNC
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:07/31 |B221521A|a17MakHis7DXTF ÷ehdstdrfield ELMT Nr Colchester KPP Tunbridge Wells LTT r, Blackburn holds TD drenN Enq—hpies to: Peter Laws (0214) 6 67130 LN Hampton Court Palace N thamptonshire) Burghley House, Stamford Somerset) Montac0te Housf, Yeovil S olk) Kentwell Hall, Long Melford holds T udor days (boo£dd school J qne 22nd - July 13th, al3f to1rs Spring and Autumn by E : (0787) 310297 SSPN r Guildford WPTH , Nr Wels—pool arwicks—ire) Compton Wy nyates, Nr Banbury ( iltshire) Longle t House, Warminstfr A DTE izabethan House, Totnes (splendid exampl e of Tudor MH ES thchurch Hall, Southend-on-Sea (T0dor fu rniture) LNDGMT dor sitting room with furniturf) L
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:07/54 |B221621A|a17MakHis7@XTBN ÷dndon) The Musdum of London (Tudor gall ery, worksheets available, must  advancd) NTSHN orwich (Tudor Hall and furFhture( TIM E CHART: KEY EVENTS CONNEC @DWITHTHEP ROGRAMMES C e at Haddon built HVII to thd throneN 1st Navigation Act  7 Dias sails for Africa N vigatIon Act C America JCN foundland VG India HSHV rdates Great Chambdr and parlour,  begins axte.rhons A Henry VIII HSGV rnon completds North West Tower  - 7 -  35 Coverdale's Bible publishdd  Elip—beth bastardized by Successiff Act D FNM
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:08/40 |B221821A ÷eigh knightedN Colony bdgun at 2oanoke N Start of war with S  Babington Plot Drake rescues 2oanoke coloNHsts and brings them  1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots. Families settled at  D feat of SpaFhsh Armada T  ke colony is found to bd 'lost'  Acts for the rdlief of thd poor and pu&h sHldnt of vagabonds C of Poor Law Acts of 1597  M 8 - D eath of Elizabeth I. Accession of J—des VI and IN Raleigh N Haddon: alterations to Long Gallery bdgu n by SJM CLA S READING G Henry VHH to George II , Philip Sauvain (MacMillan Education 19 82) EITES te-Thomson (Wayland Press 1984) TC untry Life, Paul Fincham (Focus on Histo ry, Longman 1982) QEI
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 2 Mar 21:09/21 |B221A21A ÷e copied or reproduced in sc hools and  colleges without further perBH3rhon. 57N Prhnted an d publis—ed at the request of  the School Broadcas ting Council for the  UK by BBC Boo£2, a divi3hon of BBC E terprises, Woodlands, 80 fod Lane,  London W12 0T T SF ublished 1985  c BBC Enterprises 1987  ISBN: 0 563 100 452 ####################################### ###################################  - 9 - 