P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/03 |B2201217 TELEVISION MAKINGHISTORY THE MIDDLE AGES A y the BBC at the request of the School B roadcasting CUK omN Lower SecondaryN BBAL1 Tuesdays N 52-10.12 am from 12 January. Repeated T hursdays 9.52-10.12 am SP Jill Sheppard ######################## ######################################## ########## CONTENTS  THE PEASANTS' REVOLT 12 Jan2ar8 Programmfs aims, 14 January   ts, background THE CASTLE 19 January  21 January  p work. THECHURC H 26 January  28 D n2 ary THENN 2 Febrr ry  4 Febr|c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:05/34 |B2202217|a17MakHis4|i14TEXT|m336D|s÷n1÷ euary THETRADER S 9 February  11 F—ar2 ary #################################### ###################################### THENN 2 February, 4 February ######### ######################################## ######################### P s T e establishment and history of a  own, and to encourage further work on to wn and guild organisation. B rogralne SL oln on it, and draw attention to its  ition between the Humber and Wash, and t he rivers Trent and Witham. W d briefly explain guild; indfnture; appr entice; burgess;  TH E PROGRAMME UL , this film gives an explanation of some of the 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:01/41 |B2203217 erical rdasons for the growth of towns. It LR oman settlemdnt; the founding of  and cathedral by William thd Conqudror; and phe growth of the town  centre up to the early 15th Century. - 1 I , wd look at the rfsponsibilities of  ousewife, the work of hdr h—@d, and the relationship of a carpenter and  enticd. In the last sdction, we look br iefly at the way in which  overned at this period. SNRCESUSED M uch of the dramatic dialogue is based on : TGDPAHP (London 1928) PBBER ickert (Chatto & Gindus 1923) TB f the Kf@ght of La Tour-Landry ed T Grig ht (ADTS 1868) @LACES TO VISI$ AFTER T@ E PROGRAMME LINOLNDC daily May-Oct. Closed Sun Nov Mar.|c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/14 |B2204217|b17MakHis4|i14TEXT|m3A43|s÷n1÷ e O A thedral, cathedral library and treasury, the Close housfs  ings, including the Bishop's Palace. O Steep Hill and High Street are situated many buildings shown in the  as well as the Norman gMfw's House' and St Mary's Guildhall. NA the top of Bailgate. TLA ological Trust, at Sessions House, Lindu m Road, can be  ent and publishes a number of interestin g NBAS 1984, a major multi-media  hibition about Lincoln will be mounted i n the City and County M houses permanent displays of coins and other artefacts. O some Sundays. BACKGROUNDINFORMATION TGT T laces that were safe, and easy for meeti ng: at ES
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/38 |B2205217|a17MakHis4|i14TEXT|m3DAE|s÷n1÷ etreet and the Fosse gay in Lincoln); at a  easy to bridge; on the coast with a  r or road running in-land which made it easy to transport goods. T sf towns were market-placesN Markets co uld develop whfre  a given place and time to exchange thing s, but  ools made by craftsmen rather than  elves, for instance, iron pots or scythe s, barrels, leather buckets  darnessesN gherever craftsmen gathered together (for whatever  ew sp. Country people sold food to town s and townspeople  P e were always robbers and bands of  mfn aboutN Lincoln had the protection at first of a Roman fort on a NT Danes, as in York or Lincoln, took over old sites or foundfd 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/02 |B2206217 ÷er burghsN (Hence borough, burgess.) gden the later ASK England, they too (contrary to popular b elief) NB the Norman Conquest towns were growing quite fastN After 1066, many more castl es, cathedrals, abbeys and  ere foundedN Travel was made safer thro ugh the imposition of KP N Craftsmen came to live under the prot ection of a  M 2 -  titution, whfre the garrison and clerc8 were good AD esday Book there were already 6 towns L ondon, York, Lincoln, Norwich, Wincheste r, Thetford) with a population  ,000 people. TRADE B ages, kings, lords and churchmen wanted to buy luxury  example, silks, spices (to disgrHse the flavour 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:07/27 |B2207217|a17MakHis4|i14 FXT ÷eand silver goods, and wineN Even coun try  conomy) would buy everyday things like loth or shoes rather than make themN Tr ade was international (see P and, in some cities, women as well as me n, became drapers,  . GUILDS C GUILDSN Thfir purpose was to prevent ba d  ach other. Before an9nne became a  sman he/shf had to become 'apprenticedgN Apprfntices were bound to  an agreement called an 'indenture'N Th ey promised to work  up to seven yearsN In return, hf taugh t them his MM nd fed, clothed and housed them. Thfn t he  g for daily wagesN He could work for  y master, in any town. He however could only become a master if the 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:07/48 |B2208217|a17MakHis4|i14TEXT|m417ED|s÷n1 ÷epproved his best work, his 'masterpiec e', and he made a payment to N But by the mid-15th Century, thf paymen t was so high that many  not afford it, and they remained employ ees all thfir NG trict: working hours were from sun-up to M work after dinner on Saturdays, no  at all on Sunday, or Church Holy DaysN (The working conditions were  r than in the 19th Century.) T y of goods was regularly checked by 'sea rchers', and  allowed. Guildsmen paid yearly contrib utions  funerals, and prayers for the dead. Som e  nised for social and religious N All guilds had spfcial days whfn they p ut on plays (often based B s), held processions, pageants or fe|c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/12 |B2209217 ÷easts. TOWNGOVERNMENT changing and evolvingN At first, towns were the property of the King or local l ordN dhey had to buy a Charter  dem the independfnce to manage their own affairs; to hold markets  out compftition from others nfarby, and to tax strange  access to the townN Only freemen, burg esses M citizens had a say in run.hng the town. By the 13th Century the town 'council' w as responsible for law and order, L ighting, streets, dffence, searching out fraud by traders and V sing MPs. TOWNSANDCGTNTRY I ter middle ages, three-quarters of the p opulation, at least,  countrysideN Most pfople were employed in agriculture.  d gardens and fields within their wall1, where 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/35 |B220A217 ÷e requirements of towns were largely me t  ry areas.  n to be manufactured, thf processes took  - NIL ost famous cloth manufactured in the  n was Lincoln scarletN dhis was high qu ality cloth which at home could  legally worn by kings, bishops and judge s, though there was a  t abroadN (It is thought that Will Scar lett, in the RH been of noble descent - one who could w ear AW Staple transferred from Lincoln to B on, the citizens refused to produce the scarlet cloth any more, and L n came into widespread use. O important in the mediaeval pfriod for t heir role in the  of wool and wool products included S|c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/50 |B220B217 ÷eouthampton, YCB Leicester, Winchester, Nottingham, Nort hampton, GNB Louth, Stamford, Bury St EdD4nds, B ableL Hadleigh and London. A ills developed cloth-making moved into country areas whdrd  running water (a parallel to the eably f actory NT ised the various processes of the  making industry w—pe quick to see the av antages of using country NI less easy for thd workdrs to become org afHsed M espfcially hf they worked from their cottages - than in the towns which had a  O towns. Lincoln, for example, was  for its skilful cornw—hn—ps who made s— oes and boots of leather C ordova in Spain (hence the  fo r its local 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:08/02 |B220C217|a17MakHis4|I14TEXT|m42595|svn1 ÷de cathfdral's misericordia, made pinna cles for the   for thd cloister and the mediaeval libr ary NA werf ssed for scaffol$hng, chespnut  ceilings and oak for lo.f lasting, stur dy roof-beams. FOLLOWUP WORK  Look cardfully at your nearest town I s it on a hill, in a valley,  river, near a sea port, or even on a ra rchds or other buildings with dates on t hem? 3 Look at spreet namesN Can the class tell aF8thing from them about the town's past? Remembdr a stre et ending in 'gate' can mdan either  that there was once a town gatd there , or, in towns where Danes  d, bust street. (Gate is the DaFHsh wor d for street). V yo0r local musdum and see what they can s—ow you fr om thd later MA 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:08/41 |B220D217428FF|s÷n1 ÷e Get a map of your county. Can th e class find places which grew up  around a castle, cathedral or mona2tdry ? I hf town? Can the class find out whe&  it began? G f for law and orddr, thf fire serfhce, a nd H is it organised compared to the  Middle Ages?  owns so often suffer from outbreaks of f ire   4 - F t periodN In what way  ifferent today? Can the class thinc of any ways in which  bden good dfterrents to crime?  Thdre were many attempts to stop food—al l being pl!xdd. Find out  her sports were allowed which ard banned nowadays. G
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:10/00 |B220E217 ÷ddraw or make something which a mediaev al  Choosd pdo0le to be guildsmdn and  gdt thdm to 'assess' whdther they th ink the work could qtal—by as a  masterpiece'. TG Porrays'N Boil greens with oNhons in wa tfr or P cheese or fish in the bottom of a bowl and pour the 'porrays over.  G—y was bder often drunk with meals rather than water? W a housewife an evdn harder job than it is toda8? I rentice came from the country, how did h e H ow could he trust what was said in  the indenture? Does thd cl!r2 think l ife in the housdhold would  asant?  would he enboy about lifhng in a town? Do they think the  maidservant had a good life? 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:10/50 |B2210217 ÷e Edward III holds parliament  ere. TB th Earl of Warwick HY ' War against the French begins  Battle of Crecy (Edward H TB champ involved TBD ills about 1 in 3 of populatIon Labo0r  W ill expanding BP Edward HH W Staple fixed at Calais (Edward I HX GS ism bfgins. Ond popd in Rome, one in Av ignon. D hierarchy. TPR II RB becomes 13th Earl of Warwick L coln becomes self-govfrning C ch unity restored F ding of Lincoln Cathedral J f Arc capturdd and burnt at sta£d, Sdag e set for declind E r in Francd. TW
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/00 |B2211217436A7|s÷n1 ÷e YLF astrians JF up at Northleach C panding rapidly WS nd homas Betson trading with merchants from F TS ngd helps build Laven(—m Church  King RIchard III bef—ns late mediabtal k eep at Garwick KRIII killed at Battle of Bosworth  2 CLASSREADING T eratdly selected to appeal to a range of abilities and C GENERAL THE MEDIAEVAL WORLD J A P Jgne1 ( Macmillan E on 1981) THEMI@D LE AGES J Nichol & D Downton (Basil  Blackwell 1981)  MEDIAEVAL LIFE (Focus on History) V Bailey & E Wise  (Longman 196 ) 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/00 xB2212217 ÷e THE MIDDLE AGES, B FD 4 , CAMBRIDGE INTRODUC$JON TO  THE HISTORY OF MANKIND ed T C airns (C U P 1972)  MEDIAEVAL BRI @IN (Ope hn£s in His—ory ) R Unwin H nson 1981) PrograRdd 1 - TH D @EASANTS' @VOL (Then and Th—pe serhe s) THEPEASANTSREVOLTMP Longman 1980) P THE MEDIAEVAL CASTLE (T——f and T(dp— sep ies) THECASTLEMR Longman 1963) E XPLORE A CASTLE Brian Davi3nn (H!dish Ha milton   - THE CASTLE STORY Shehla Sancha (Kestrel 1979)  CASTLES - A GEIDE FOR YOUN M THE MONASTERY (Resourcd Unit) D B irt (Longman THECHURCH 74)  LB@ NIN
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/00 |B2213217 ÷eG IN MEDIAEVAL TIMES (Then and Thdrd series) G Evaf2 (LongD n 1974)  n 1982)  MEDIAEV C Jordan and T Woo d (Edwin Arnold 1982)  HISTORIC CHURCHES P2O @bT @AA@ ed 1983) P LINCOLN THE TOGN Book) D0lc—— Du ke (CUP 1980)  T ) MRL gman 1981) THE MEDIAEVAL TOWN (Resource Unit) D Birt  (Longd n 1974) P pograDde 5 THE STONERS (Fam P J Fefferies (Nelson 1978) 
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/22 |B2214217440E5|s÷n1 ÷e - MEDIAEVAL TRADE (The Way It G!r S Yaxle8  (Martins of Berwick 1977)  M WOOL MERCHANTS OF THE 11TH CEN RY (Thfn and  T(dpe sdrieq G Scott Thoma GUILDHALL, LAVENHAM, SUFFOLK (NathoF l Trust) RG er (Workshop Press 1983)  - SHIPS AND VOYAGES (Resource Un it) J Nichol L o fDan 1974)  7 - PLACBTOVISIT C , Northulberland Carlisle Castle; hchm ond Castle North Yorkshire. MIDLANDST attershall Castle Lincolns—ird; Tamwort h, Staffs; Rockingham, N SN TH AND SOUTH EAST: Bodiam Castle, Sussdx; Caris brooke, Isle of Wig—t; LCK t. DST AND SOUTH @ST: Corfe Castle|c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:03/51 |B2215217|a17MakHis4|i14TEXT|m4444F|s÷n1 ÷e, Dorset; Restormel Castle, Cornwall; Totnes Castle, Devon. BLESBC astleL Anglesey; Chepstow Castle; Caerna rvon Castle; C SCOTLANDS Castle; KildruVlz, nr Alford; Tantallon Castle, East L NORTHERNIRELAND CarrYckfergus, Co Antrim; Duncluce, Co A ntrim, GCD THEMEDIAE VAL CHURCH NORHERNENGLANDF Abbey; Rievaulx Abbey, N Yorks; Lindisfa rne P MIDLANDSWPS pringham Monastery, Lincolnshire. SOUTH AND SOUTH EAST: Great Coxwell Tithe Barn , Oxon; Waltham Abbey. WESTANDSOUTHE ST: Bradford-on-Avon Tithe Barn; Buckfas t Abbey; CP WALESS David's Cathedral and Abbey; Tintfrn Abb ey, Gwent. SCOTLANDDA Melrose Abbey; Cambuskenneth Abbey. NORT HERN IRELAND: Devenish Island, Lower Lou gh Erne, Enniskillen; inch ACD n; Armagh Friary, Armagh; Dungiven P|c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:02/04 |B2216217|a17MakHis4|i14TEXT|m447B9|s÷n1 ÷eriory, Londonderry. TOWNSTRADEAND SOCIAL LIFE NORTHERNENGLANDBM eum, Barnard Castle; Ryfdale Folk Museum , HMHKMN ; York Story (Museum) York. MIDLANDS itehouse Museum of Building and Country Life, Aston Munslow; CMN ingham; Castle Musfum, Durham. SOUTHAND SOUTH EAST: Weald and Downland O0fn Air Museum, Chichester; RME nglish Rural Life; Saffron Walden Museul . WESTANDSOUTHWESTSM Sherborne Museum; Treasurer's HI minster. WALESSFFM Cardiff; Merchant's House, Tenby. SCOTLA ND: Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow; Invfrness Museum; NM um of Antiquities, Edinburgh. NOTHERNIR ELAND: Ulster Museum, Belfast. ######### ######################################## ######################### MAKINGHISTOR Y: This publication cont—hns |c
P734 CEEFAX 734 Wed 3 Feb 21:02/28 |B2217217 ÷eonly BBC copyright THEMIDDLEAGES material: its contents M—8 be copied or reproduced  schools and colleges without further pe rmission. NP d and published at the request of the Sc hool B Council for the UK by BBC Books, a  division of BBC Enter prises, Woodlands, 80 Wood  Lane, London W12 0TT SPRING 88 First published 1983 c BBC Enterprises 1987  ISBN 0 563 340444 ################# ######################################## #################  - 8 - 