P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/05 |B2204216|a17Scene13AF e based on thd story of a poor  villacd youth w ho tries his luck in  Bangkok as a Boxer Film ed in Thailand. ######################## ######################################## ##########  24, 25 Mar COMPETI HFN  Are we compethtive by naturf Is  mpetition a gogd and/or necessar8  characteri1t ic of people and society? ############## ######################################## #################### GENERALNO DSFO R TEACHERS OURAIMSOURAUDIENCE T SCENE series tries to provide each week a stimulating and relevant  p teenacdps, to encourage thou£ht —o1p and dAscussion of a  ary social and personal issufs S DNE s hould work 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/00 |B2205216 eged 14-16+ at school, b0t it will be fo und  ing with reluctant pupils. SCENE is  on a two yeab cycle, sg that no program mf is rdpeated in the 8far  st transmi3rhon. It is thus suitabld fo r viewing by pupils  ears. JANUARY SENTENCE OF THE COURT ################# ######################################## ################# A hd aims and effectiveness of different t ypes of N ################################### NB Teachers may likd to rffer to thd l!8 "A Visitor from Outer Spaceb,  roup of youngsters on a CommuFhty Servic e Order, transmitted in S drm 1986 BACKG N@ND INFORMATION S W af the court passds sentdnce, it's s0ppg sdd to l@be it vdry clear to yo0 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:01/16 |B2206216|a17Scene13|i14 JXT ÷ectly what it involves. There is a wid e range of sentfnces that can be  to young peopleN They can be looked at as a kind of ladder up  progress as they re-offend and reappear in court. ABSOLUTEORCONDIHONAL DISCHA2GE: An absolute discharge is rar e and  offences. A conditional discharge  ires that you don't offend again for a s pecified period up to three  se you'll be brought back to the court a nd sfntenced for the  well as the nfw one. BINDOVER You, or if they agree, your parents, can be 'bound overg  money to ensure you don't offend agahn for a  is forfeited.  M 2 - FINESCGBTSAN D COMPENSATION: A young person can be o rdfred to pay 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:02/10 |B2207216<—17Scene13|i14TEXT|m4147E|svF ÷e depdnding on the offence and age of o ffender Also,  y compensation, up to |—2,000, to yo1p v ictim, for  e done to a car that you had ta£dn and d riven U n w—y they should't, it's your 0 rents ho (—ve to pay your fine and compensatio n You can alsg be ordered to  c osts of the case. SUPERVISIONORDE RS: You can be put under the s1perviq—o n of a social  r who will 'advise, assist and befriend' sion ordfr can last from 6 months to 3 ears, and can bd madd tougher by rdquirh ng you to do specific things to  in order (thdn it's called Intermediate Treatment M IT)F Yo0 l—8  in a spdcified place and prdsent yoursel f when and where the H You d—x be made to take part in c|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/00 |B2208216|a17Scenf13|i14TEXT|m417E7|s÷n1 ÷eertain recreational  ivities. You may have a gnight restrict ion', or curfew,  ly means you can't go out at night excep t with a NY be banned from doing certain things or oing to certain places, like a football ground or some place where you  nto trouble againN It's all intendfd to "help the young N s wth the commuNhty in which he/she live s". If a  ion order his or her parfnts may be aske d to  EXCLUSIONORDERS This is a new order dfsigned to deal w ith violence NT ourt can prohibit someone from attending NT his order can only bf made in  o a sentence imposed on the convicted of fendfr or in addition to  er or conditional or absolute discha|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:05/25 |B2209216|a17Scene13|i14TEXT|m41B51|s÷n1 ÷erge.) F : ATTENDENCECENTREORDERSY an be sentenced to between 12 and 24  rs of attendence at a centre, which usua lly means 2 hours every other S fternoon for 6 to 12 weeks. Centres are generally run by the  physical exercise and other instruction , the idea being  re and to bring young people "under the influencf  y and the State." COMMUNITYSERVIC E ORDERS: CSOs were introducfd as a con structive A g person can be ordered to perform betwe en  ly useful work in the commuVhty. T ust be suitable work available, and an o ffender must agree to it  o doing it. CAREORDERA ffender may be taken into the carf of th e local 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/09 |B220A216 ÷eserious enough and if it is thought to be the  control needed. DEFNTIONCENTRE This is a custodial sentence M you're locked up. P can range from 3 weeks up to 4 monthsN This  ment of physical exercise and strict  itary-style discipline (for boys only)N This is thought to be a good  but research is bfchnning to show that, after the initial  quite enjoy the rechme, which isn't wha t was  it criminalsN But others suggest that f it's doing offendfrs some good, then i t's a worthwhile punishlfnt.  - 3 -  YOUTH CUSTODY: This involves being put away for a period of between  re than 12 months, and applies to both b oys and girls. This is 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:07/13 |B220B216|a17Scene13|i14TEXT|m42225|s÷n1 ÷ething to what used to be called Borsta l trainingN In youth  till supposed to be a strong element  useful traiNhng  I with any of the 'lesser' sentences,  y can always be taken back to court and sentenced again to something  . JUVENILESINCUSTODY B nd 1985, the proportion of boys aged 14 to 16 sentenced to  to 12%, while the proportion of girls r ose from 1%  T s of juveniles leaving custody are high. 80% of boys  outh custody, and 75% of boys leaving de tention  two 9fars. PERCENTAGESOFJUVENILESSEN $FNCED: 1982  MALES 14-16 GI RLS 14-16 A arge 22% 39|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/15 |B220C216<—17Scene13|i14TEXT|m4258F|s÷n1 ÷e% SO 17% 20% F 2R % 28% AC 16% 7% CSO 4% 1% CO er 2% 3% DC 8% - YCC 4% - O dealt with 1 % 1% AFTERTHEP OGRAMME W you think the most likely to put  co-l—tting a crime? Do you thinc you w ould prefer a 'short sharp N etention centrd or a long drawn o0t supe rvasion order or   ghich of the following statdments do yo u agree with: P
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:05/35 |B220D216|a17Scene13|i14TEXT|m428F9|s÷n1 ÷f retribution M so society can get its own back. T uld be to deter others from comVhtting s uch  C in prison to protect society. P hmfnt should be usfful M it should try t o reform the offender.  think about the following statements: ) b...'f do need a level of punishment sufficient to cause people to  e before they commit a crimeb. James An derton, Chief Constable GM ester Police.  M 4 - FI the birch and the birch and the birch ag ain. I cannot  who indulge in it should pay the full pr ice. LA T nal law is to punish - the reformation o f the  ssbN Former Lord Chief Justice Goddard. L
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/20 |B220E216 ÷eooth for tooth....bN Exodus, Chapter 21, Versd 23. N as had its vengfance, I should like the world to N  Caryl Chdssman fust before hi1 exea1th on C H ced in July 1948 for kidnap. TF t your answers to Question 2: did your v iews change when Q G ow offenders on a young person in  cusdody? I ordered to pay compe.r—tion, his or hfr parents are expfcted to pay the money Do you think this is an effective  pqnAshing thd offender? F offence that is puFHshable by a fine, th ere is a maximum T courts can and do take account an obben ddr's F to fine him hdrN But they can ndver  ne more than the maximum for that gf|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/04 |B220F216|a17Scene13|i14TEXT|m42FCD|s÷n1 ÷efence. Is this fair? Should there  a maximum? Supposing someone is so ric h that even the MAXIMUM fine  only a $JNY proportion of their wealth. Can we say that they  properly if the maximum fine is imposed ? O pfr person sentenced to Community S ce OrderN In 1985 it cost |—267 pfr wee k to keep a young offender in D n Centre or Youth Custody CentreN Do yo u think this is a good  ? Or should it be spent in other ways? eg compensating O ternatives to custodial sentences? Or w hat? D nk would be the bad things about being n a Detention Centre or Juvenile Court? Are there any good things yo2  of? TSSSD tion Centres are for boys only. Girls annot be sent to a Detention Centre.|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:05/05 |B2210216 ÷e ghy do you think this is?  sentencing a guilty person, what conside ration sTould be given to  well as the person who committed the cr ime? TD Star (28.5.87), outline the policies of the thrfe major parties on the subfect o f Law and Ordfr. ghat do you  the main differences between them? CONS ERVATIVE: "Crime level1 have been risin g in most countries in recent  people are rightly deeply anxious. That is why we have always  ice AND have taken practical steps to fi ght crimeN We've  wer by more than 16,000F We have givdn the courts  entences, especially for violent crimesN W ilding programme this century. W roduced reforms to help tackle child abu seN We're cracUhng down 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/11 |B2211216 ÷e thugs, so that they can be dfprived o f their ill-gotten gains.  M 5 - A e're re-elected, we will extend the same approach to other N do so many Labour councils always try to damagf  ban the police from schools? The party  ports, rather than seeks to  hf forces of law and order." LABOUR "We will put more police where they are needfd M on the beatN We  crime prevention grants for home-owners and tenants alike,  t of stronger locks on doors and windows N We will  rovide better street lighting and employ more  people who can help to deter vandals  d criminals. We will give more help to victim support schemes and 
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/12 |B2212216 —17Scene13|i14TEXT|m43A09<2÷N0 ÷d groups. Cutting employment and imprn ving our inner cities will  he REAL cause of crime." ALLIANCEC ime has rocketed under thd Consdrvatives , so it is nonsense  s thf party of "law and orderbN But is is not true  ut crimeN The Alliance would tackle bot h MLH ssness, unemployment and  st accommodation are breeding gro2nds of dfliNpqdncy As a  rget Crime Crisis Areas, those with the highest rates D e more police on streets and local polic e  T nts for entry phonds and security  and all public telephonds would be kept in constant rdpair. PR entation for local government could end most "loony C ief Officers s—ould have full operat|c
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/10 |B2213216|a17Scene13|i14 DXTD ÷eional  USEF UL @SOURCES LDLO r, RAchard Edwards Wagland (pqblisher) L td, W H ESB N3 1JD, England. PROGRAMMELENGTH NE raVlfs were scheduled tg be 20 minutes l ong,  ve run ovdr that time because we felt  e matdrial mdrited an over-run To avoi d all conf5rhon documdntaries  now on scheduled to run qp to 25 min0tds . UNITS T rammes this term. We have grouped them like  they dhght be usedN The programmfs  d as single programmes in the—r own rig— t, so that it is not necessary  oth progr!hlfs if that is inconvfnient. ######################################## ################################## DDD BACK AND ONTACT WITH DACHERS W
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:10/02 |B2214216440DD|s÷n1 ÷dneed feedback from teachers about our prograDlds to improve our service  chers and pupils We can sefd yo0 a 30p ply of feedback cards if you  e address below But we are not recdhvi ng enough cards from  part of thd UK for us to have a large e nough sample on  about, for instance, whdther a progradld deservds NE s straight to the producdr'1 gbfhce and is  erndd. And we really do value the  nal contact we can then establish.  Ple!rd write or telephone for a su pl y of cards to me: RTBB C School TV, Television Centre, Londonw W12 8QT. D or 01 743 8000 Ext 8143 ################ ######################################## ################## SCENEPLAYSINP
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:10/07 |B2211216|a17Scend13|i14TE T|m44447|s÷n1 ÷eRINT: L umes of Scend Scripts, in their imprint series Details are: SCENEQCRIPTS g60 Single, 100 Return', 'Terry', 'Hero in the Dust', IAC Sweep', 'Time Hurries On', 'Last Busg. ISBN 0 582 23334 8. SCENESCRIPTSA First Class Friedd', 'The Ballad of Ben Bagot', 'Bank Holiday', 'Quiet Afternoo n', 'Break Ing ISBN 0 582 233357 7. S CENE SCRIPTS 3: 'Coins against thd Wall' 'The Kids are O£—y' (part 1 and  If Only', 'Consequences' (part 1 and 2) ISBN 0 582 22309 1. SCENESCRIPTS 'Judo Champ', 'Stimulation Exercise', 'A nd Mum Came Too', TCFISBN 2 22393 8. SCENESCRIPTS 'Good Neigh bours' 'Wide G!lds', 'Just Deserts' an d YPMNISBN 4 7.  Price |—2.50 each ##################################
P721 CEEFAX 721 Wed 3 Feb 21:10/01 |B2216216<—17Scene13|i14 @XT|m447B0|s÷n1 ÷e###################################### ## SCENET ains only BBC copyright materialN Its conte&ts may be copied or rdproduced in schools and  colleges without further permission. S pr 88 c BBC Enterprises 1987 Printed and published at the  request of the School Broadcasting C ouncil for the United K gdom by BBC Books, division of BBC Enter prises, W d Lane, London W12 0TT. N ISBN 0563 340479 ##################### ######################################## #############  - 7 