P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/21 |B2201218|a17MakHis3|i14 JXT TELEVISION MAKINGHISTORY THE MIDDLE AGES A y the BBC at thf request of the School B roadcasting CUK om. Lower SecondaryN BBCL1 Tuesdays  52-10.12 am from 12 JanuaryN Repeated T hursdays 9.52-10.12 am SP Njll Sheppard ######################## ######################################## ########## CONTENTS P THE CHURCH 26 Januar8 content, sources, 28 January   ormation, and dHE TOWN 2 February  4 Febr4ary  THE TRADERS 9 February  11 February ######### ######################################## ######################### ############ ####################################|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/31 |B2202218|a17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m336D|s÷n1÷ e########################## THECHURCH 26 J ANUARY, 28 JANUARY ##################### ######################################## ############# PA T y something of the naturf of mediafval r eligious experience; to  archy of the Church; to explain the wide ranging  of the Church in medicine, poor relief a nd  sits to monasteries; and to  rther reading, for example, on pilgrimag esN Relatively few  he programme, since, in this respect, mo st N BEFORETHEPOGRAMME  plain the words: pope; bishop; abbot; pa rdoner; friar; NS class Walsingham, Norwich and Castle Acr e on a N THEPROGRAMME In 1420, three pilgrims meet on thei|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/14 |B2203218 er way to thf Shrine of Our Lady at W ingham in NorfolsN Through their eyes, we experience different  Church at a time when, while most peopl e still believed  Church, thfre was increasing scepticism about the  M 1 - I n between their convfrsations, the prese ntfr takes  monastery for a look at some of the key buildings which can still be identified; to a tithf barn; and to a  pital. At the end of the programme, the pilgrims arrive at W S s ssed CHAUCERCT WILLIA M LANGLAND Piers Plowman P sit after the programme CAP ory, Castle Acre, Norfolk (DoE): open da ily. TTBPN By written application to: Mr J M , Hall Farm Cottage, Paston, North g|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:04/31 |B2204218 ealsham, Norfolk. The Slipper Shrine, H oughton St Giles, nr Walsingham, Norfolk . MM June, B4ly, September and October) he Holy House in the Anglican Shrine, Walsi ngham, Norfolk (Pilgrimagfs  fnd Easter Novembdr with torchlight pr g and August Bank Holid!xr( SPH ngate Church, Norwich, Norfolk (for chur ch relics). NCT , Norwich, Norfolk G thd Visitors' Officer, Norwich 26290, i n advance. SMCG s(hpe. BACKGROUNDINFORMAT FN TC urch in England in the Latdr Middle Agas : Its Power and Influence T rival to the Church as an organisdd str ucturd in Mediaeval ENI was part of an international Catholic Ch urch and of a  'Christendom', whose doctrines and |c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:05/01 |B2205218|a17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m3DAE|s÷n1÷ eorganisation  hf Western World. TEA na' was also part of the English StateN Half of its S ate and the abbots and bishops were grfa t  advisors, judges and leaders of  ommunities. Living in palaces (thf Bi1h op of Lincoln had 10  r houses) surrounded by an arl8 of other clergymen,  lined lay and cleric in their diocese as well  T hf intellectual life of England was domi nated by clerics in the cathedral  nastic schools, grammar schools, and sni versities, whilst the Church  mafor social function, nowadays carried out by the Government  oups (eg running hospitals for the poor and sick,  
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:05/25 |B2206218|a17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m41119|s÷n1 ÷e 2 - TC of Church (or Canon) Law and courts whIc h  amy, divorce, wills, orphans, libel,  ual offences, sacrilege, blasphemy, fail sre to pay tithfs and numerous  idents. These courts had the power to f ine, imprison for life,  do penance and to excommunicate them. The Parish Church and its Priest E parish had its church and towns had maV8 N York, with 10,000  churches and 500 clerc8 in the 14th Cen turyN "fligion C focus of ordinary people's livesN Birth ,  rounded by religious ceremony: the  s calendar was regulated as much by the liturgy as by the seasons: a  a holy da8N Thf Church was the venuf f or prayers and S clamations and business transactions|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/43 |B2207218|a17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m41483|svn1 ÷e, for  rs and plays and for much more. T ical village priest would be of yeoman s tock, barely literate and  his own 50 acres of glebeland to ensure an incomeN He would  m, weddings, death bed visitations and b urials and thf  m a share of the tithe, the 10% tax give n by the T iest would do little preaching but  H ew little Latin and sndfrstood  he was the link between the villagfrs a nd eternity. TM D he Middle Ages, millions of people becam e monks and nuns and there  steries, colleges or nunneries in Englan d alone in 1400N One  s that it was believed to be better for their souls to  he world, and concentrate on serving|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/15 |B2208218|a17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m417ED|s÷n1 ÷e God; but  ants, they joined to be sure that, at th e very NI thfy were girls, thfy sometimes entered a  r miserable spinsterhood. (The C as one of the few 'careers' open to sppf r-class women.) O Orders, from which many others derived, was that of SBIAD founded a monastery in Monte Cassino wit h these W e service of God....our faith will grow and we will follow God's commandments wi th joy..N We will remain in the  y until we dieN As we will share in the sufferings of Christ, we  in his glory in heaven.' Benedictines s wore to live like  hfir abbot, and never marryN They spent part of  e fields), part of it studying and c|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:07/10 |B2209218|a17MakHis3 ÷eopying H raYhlgN But inevitably, as the Benediat ines  hdir sdandards declined By thd 12th C ndury, St Bernard of Citeaux and founded anothdr major Orddr the C dictN In England, F valleys such as Rieva0lx, Jerva0lx, B8la nd, Fountains KY . Thfy became 6dpy successf0l at sheepM farming O ri ch. SO easyN In winter a monk or n1n got up t about 2 am; until about 9 o'cloci he w ent to various chqrch services,  ied in betwden; bedween 9 and 12 there w as work including  ry affairs in thd chapter housd; then a 'sq.f& E—r2  pm more work; then ser4iae and study qnt il bed NIVD
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:06/12 |B220A218|a17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m41EC1|s÷n1 ÷e day was much longer, leaving little t ime for  M 3 - F blood-letting 'to subdue the flesh' were NBMA he rules had tended to rflax again,  labourers and lay-brothers or sisters of ten did much of the physical  ding brewing and cookingN Thf wealth of the Church attracted  must be remembered that the Orders had t o support the  et costly materials for copying books; m aintain  ree lodging for all travellers who wishe d I Duke of Gloucester brought   one monastery and stayed for 2 weeks! After the Black Death, and the  of labour which followed, monks tried to save money by renting L they supplemented their income by se|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/04 |B220B218@XT|m4222B|snn1 ÷elling guarantdes of  n old age and 'indulgencfsgF For all th esd reasons (as  often comfort in which the8 lived) the8 were  indd (thdoreticall9) celibatd and did othing to increase thd birthratd after t he Black Death! FP O rders of Friars grdw sp as a re—btion to the cloistered monksN The  famously the Franciscans) went out on t he roads of Mediadval E in the native tongue, lithng simple liv es and entering  here of villagd and town life. P ges were a haphazard blend of df6ftion a nd holiday and their  iafval landscapf madd phdm an obvIous ba ckdrop to this  Phe Shrine of Our Lady in Walsingham is the only one in England near which S have appearedN A S xon nobldwoman |c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:08/00 |B220C218|a17MakHis3 ÷ecalled Richaldis M d her to build a little house to relhnd people of JNNT ark the spot, a spring gushdd qp From 1061 W ges, and many people were curdd after  siting thd Shrine. FOLLOGUPWORK  Visat a monastdry. Most abbeys and prh ories werd built to a similar G the class to identify the ch1rch, chapt er house, dormitory,  and cloister If there is an infirmary, find out what  G the class to make drawings of mon£2 g hat would they be doing in  f thd monaster9 G esign the inital letter for a word in an illuminated E hhght a monk have ssed to $n this work? Get  feather quills. T y to day life in a moF—0ter8 Ge— t|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:08/02 |B220D218|a17MakHis3|i14 @XTFF ÷ehfm to write a  of a novice W ge Get the class to have a 'qilend' me al,  6 Find out thd most important shrinds in Britain and A4 ropd, and get the  a map. Draw the Pilgrims' Way from Lond on to C  are Me cca and V raF—rh?  M 4 - R logue to 'Thd Canterbtry —lesgN Get th e class to prdtend  iscuss their reasons for going on a pilg rimcff. H G hat problems might they expdrience en  ute? F cathddrals in Britain are, and mark  m in on a map How many of them are rdc ent foundations? I l church with stained glass or wall pain get them to do drawings or their ow
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:10/05 |B2210218<—17MakHIs3|i14 @XTD ÷eCastle  M 5 - SM s Parliament EI mpaign in Wales EI Scotland BB EIILS f' pown LI ld market. Edward III holds parliament there. TMB ecomes 11th Earl of Warwick H red Years' War against the Frdfbh bdg—ls BCEIIIT Nm—s Bea0champ involved TB k Death kills about 1 in 3 of 0npulation Labour  W trade sdill expanding B Poitiers (Edward HH4 WS le fixed at Cal!Hs (Edward I H  Great Schism begins Ond po0d in Rome, one in Avignon. DI th church hierarchy. TP s' Revolt ( HH H R
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/04 |B2212218JXT|m43A11|snn1 ÷ends (Macmillan  Education 1981) T HE MIDDLE AGES J Nichol & D Downton (Bas il B ) MEDIAEVALLIFE Focus on HIstory) F Bailey & E Gise  (Longman 196  THE MIDDLE AGES, BOG@ 4, CAMBRIDGE INT ODUCTIONTO THE HISTORY OF MANKIFD ed T —hp.b (C U P 1972)  MEDIAEVAL BRITAIN (OpdNhngs in Histor y) R Unwin H inson 1981) PDD T es) HEPEASANTSREVOLTMP (Longman 1980) P HE MEDIAEVAL CASTLE (Then and here se ries) HE CASTLE M Reeves (Longman 1963)  !lhlton  0 7|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:01/07 |B2213218DXT ÷e0) THE CASTLE M CASTLES - A GU DE OR YOUNG PEOPLE (HMSO 1981) P M THE MONASTERY (Reso0rce Un it) D Birt (Longman T@ECHURCH 1974)  D@@ NING IN MEDIAEVAL $JMES (Then and Thdre serie1 G Evans (LongD n 1974)  THE MEDIAEVAL MONAS @RY M Reeves (Lo&fl an 1982) MEDIAE VAL MEDICINE (History in Action @ack)  C Jordan and T n od (Edwin Arnold 1982)  M HISTORIC CHQRCHES P OJECTPACK d V Sek0les (UEA  1983! @ LIN FL THE NNBDD uke (CUP 1980)  HE MEDIAEVAL TOGN (Then and Therd s|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/00 |B2214218<—17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m440E5|s÷n1 ÷eeries) MR es (Longman 19 0  THE MEDIAEVAL OGN (Reso0rce Unit D 974) PTHESTONE RS (Family History Patchds) THETRADERS P J Fefferies (Nel1on 1978) MMEDIAEV@LT @D E (The Way It W!r S Yaxle8  (Martins of Berwick 1977) WOOL MERCHANTS O There series) G Scott-Thom as (OP 1968) TH D GUILDHALL, LAVENHAM, SUF OLK (National Trust) RG ner (Workshop Press 1983)  - SHIPS AND VOYAGES (Reso0rce U nit) J Nichol  Longman 1974)  - 7 - PLACBTOFHBIT CASD D NORTHERNENGLANDA
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:00/01 |B2215218<—17MakHis3|i14 DXT|m4444F|s÷n1 ÷eCastle, Northumbdrland; Carlisle Castl e; R Castle, North Yor!1hire. MID LANDS: Tattershall Castle, Lincolnshire; SR N SO UTH AND SOUTH EAST: Bodiam Castle, Stsse x; Carisbrooke, Isle of WAght; LC tle, Kent. WESTANDSOUTH D T: Corfe Ca stle, Dorset; Restormdl Castle, Cornwall ; TCD @LES: Beaumaris Castle, Anglesey; Chepstow Castle; Caep narvon Castle; C SCOTLANDS g Castle; Kildrumd8, nr Alford Tantallo n Castle, East L NORTHERNIRELAND : Carrickfergus, Co Antrim; Duncluce, Co Antrim, GCD THEEED IAEVAL CHURCH NORTHERNENGLANDF ns Abbey; Rievaulx Abbey, N Yorks; Lindi sfarne P MIDLANDSWP Sepringham Monastery, Lincolnshire. SOU TH AND SOUTH EAS 8 Great Coxwell Tithe B arn, Oxon; Waltham Abbey. FSTANDSOUT@ GEST: Bradford-o. Avon Tithe Bar. |c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:02/08 |B2216218<—17MakHis3|i14TEXT|m447B9|s÷n1 ÷eBuckfast Abbey; CP G ALES: St David's Cathedral and Abbdy; h ntdrn Abbdy, Gwent. SCOTLAND D e Abbey; Melrose Abbdy; Cambuskenneth Ab bey. NORTHERNIRELANDDI Lower Lough Erne, Enniskillen; inch A y, Co Down; Armagh Friary, Armagh; D0Ffh vdn Priory, Londondfrry. NFNS, T @DE AND SOCIAL LIFE NORTHERNENG @FDB Musdum, Barnard Castle; R9fdale Folk Mu sdum, H HKMN : G(hdehousd Museum of Buildi&g and Coun pry Life, Aston Munslow; CM Nottingham; Castle Musfum, Durham. SN TH AND SN@TH EAST: Weald and Downland Open Air Museum, Chichester; RM of Englis— Rural Life; Saffron Walden Mu seum. DSTANDSOUTHWESTSM eum; Sherbo—ne Museum; Treasurer's H , Ilminster. WALESSFFM um, Cardiff; Merchand's Housd, dnby|c
P720 CEEFAX 720 Wed 3 Feb 21:02/00 |B2217218 ÷e. SCOTLANDKAG d Museum, Glasgow; Invdrness Museum; N ional Museum of Antiquities, Edinburgh. NO HER I @LAND: Ulster Museum Belfast.  - 8 - ####################### ######################################## ########### MAKINGHISTORYT publication contains only BBC ao08pight THEMIDDLEAGES ntents may be copied or reproduced  in schools and college s without further pdrmission. N Printdd and published at t he request of thd School  Broadcasting Council for the UK by BBC Books, a  ivAsion of BBC Enterprises, Woodlands, 8 0 Wood LL on W12 0TT SPRINGF published 1983  BBC Enterprises 1987 
P720 CEEFAX 720 Fed 3 Feb 21:03/04 |B2218218<—17MakHis3 ÷e ISBN 0 563 340444 ######## ######################################## ##########################  - 9 