P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:18/20 |B2201218 TELEVISION MAKINGHISTORY THE MIDDLE AGES A y thf BBC at thf rfquest of the School B roadcasting CUK omN Lower SecondaryN BBAL1 Tuesdays N 52-10.12 am from 12 January. Repfated T hursdays 9.52-10.12 am SP Jill Sheppard ######################## ######################################## ########## CONTENTS P 14 Jan2ar8 ontent, sources,  THE CASTLE 19 January  ation, and 21 January   THJ CHURCH 26 D n2 ary  28 January  THE $N&N 2 Febr4ar8 4 February  THE TRADERS 9 February|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:10/03 |B2202218|a17MakHis2|i14TDXT|m336D|s÷n1÷ e  11 February #################### ######################################## ############## THECASTLE 19 @@LUARY, 21 J ANUARY ################################# ######################################## # P OGRAMMEAIMS TN mans originally built castles in Britain and what NT thdir further ddvdlopmend in appfarance To  T Mhnd a castle of thd later Middle Ages, and to offer an explanation for the chan chng role of the castle at that  B EFORE THE P OGRAMME BH fdudal sysddm. G e words: lord; knight; baron; constable; N ep; portcullis; ransom; palisade.  1 - THEP NBRAMME IE
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:00/00 |B2203218 eof the fourtdenth century, T@omas Beauc bmp thf 11th A—rl  e reconstruction of Warwick CastleN Whi le campa@gning FH red Years War, hd had be—n so imprfqrbd by thd F noblemen, that hd deciddd to usd them a2  f ad G—rwica As a res0lt his new  ce1 incorporated everything a man of his wealth and expdrience could   rwick thereford provided qs with a good sftding for an examination of  ediaeval casdle, its ddfences and life w ithin its walls. We  ent and heraldry, illustrating thdse wit h a  t to the tomb of Richard Beauchamp,  obsdrve thd decline of the snight as the doMhnant force in the arH8. F dIscuss thf decreasing need for the ddf ence of castles, DW
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:10/10 |B2204218<—17MakHis2|i14DEXT|m3A43|s÷n1÷ eick came to be maintained solely as a s how-piece and  s lIke Kenilworth were abandoned. SGRC ES USED @BL Death of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Garw ick KGT RWP g 1841. PLACESTOVISITAF DR THE P2OGR AMME TBBP t, Leicestershire (wherd the bousting  s filmed) is an educational and rdcreati onal centre opfn to thf publia  ctober For further  ephone Market Bosworth 0455) 290429. G arwick Castle: Opfn all year round from 10 am KCO round from 9.30 am SMCG rwick. BACKG N ND INFORMADHFN TP posd of Castles C urposds. Some were built by the King to guard a  ect a ford or to control a townN Ot|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:11/13 |B2205218 ehers  t the lands the King had chten them. A ve all, though a castle was both a fort ress and a homeN Castles al3f  ministrative roleN Taxes were paid ther e and justice carried  D fe places for storing supplies of food a nd weapons, NL nd around the castle, farmed by peasants , was L omeN Indeed, the castle was an  p pivot in manorial society. CD ign N ne can only talk of general trends in  stle buildingN LIkewise it is not alway s easy to givd precise dates;  grdat rfctangular stone kdeps were bding bualt in England during H nry II, wooden motte and bailey structur es were still bding SN 
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:12/06 |B2207218 ÷e, so too, were the towers  rom curtain wallsN The concentric castl es of Edward I's reign  igns brought back from the B—2t by thf C rusadfrsN now  ngs of castle walls with the inner 'ward ' being   ssN Tdf inner walls were highfr than th e  urfd the outer walls, he would sthll  exposed to fire from the inner onesN Mo ats bfcame popular after about  sse it was difficult to tunnel under a w ater filled moatN New  be built in valleys as well as on hills . OS and Ireland developed in a similar  to those in England and Wales. however, long after English and Welsh  given up living in castles for defence p urposes, the Scottish I ns had thfir own particular needsN |c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:03/01 |B2208218417ED|s÷n1 ÷eThfy still required  dden raids, and so thfy built Tower Hous esN These were  and not as strong. IC A castle was like a small town wherf off could encounter all sorts of  om lady-in-waiting to stable lad, priest to blacksmith, m—rfn K hts and archers, howevfr, were few M gar risons were N f the Middle Ages, houses in the bailey had  of buildings set round a courtyard.  of them were still made from wood; with strong walls to protect thf  intfrior buildings did not nfed to be s o durableN These were  ded over the years as necessary. T inciple building was still thf Great Hal lL which was for feasts,  and performing official and public funct ionsN Originally 
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:02/00 |B2209218 ÷ehigh to allow room for smokd from thd fire to circulateN IMA ges great fireplacds along the walls rep laced the  of th e hallN At one end of the Great Hall we re  e Old French 'bouteillerid') where  was kfpt, and to the pantry (from 'pane terie') wherd the food was T he pantry was literally the brfad room; a supply of stale  be kept thdre to be used as platesN The kitchen was A t first this would have been a timber ki tchen H becausf cooking ovfr an open fire was  tremely ha:ardousN Nobody atd much brfa kfast, for they were all hard at  play by dawn  - 3 - A ds became more concerned about comfort a nd style rather than 
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:13/43 |B220A218|a17MakHis2|Y14TEXT|m41EC1|s÷n1 ÷eften built a second hall where they co sld entertain in NN would be the lord's chamber, where he wo uld retire S had many chambers: castles werf graduall y C thf chapfl, where thf falhly could  Mass every dayN The Chaplain would also act as a secretary, being  y one in the castle who could read and w rite. A educated in household of some other  dN First, a boy would serve as a page a nd learn good mannersN In his  would becomf the squire of one particula r lordL which entailed  lord, his armour and horsesN Eventuall y he would bf H n suddfnly on a battlefield, but morf of ten this  eforehandN Similarly, a baron's daughtf r 
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:00/15 |B220B218 ÷er lords to be educated by the lady of the householdN The principle function o f thd girl's education was to  r for marriagd and to run her own housdh old Marriages were  siness mattdrs rathdr than love matches, and a young  th lands and a large dowry M preferably a rich  ncreasd the power of the husband. Still ,  adval society, for this was the agd  ourtly lovdN Fighting for a lady was as chivalrous as fighting for  r for God. TC T Black Death causfd profound social chan ges, and the castle, like the  t much of its importanceN In thd old sy stem of warfare, the H to sfrve the King for forty days, but i n thd later MAN eferred to pay a finf (scutage)N th|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:03/15 |B220C218|a17MakHis2|i14TEXT|m42595|s÷n1 ÷ee success   the combination of knight and horse was no  rfareN The peasant infantryman was  cheaper to pay and equip than the mount ed man-at-arms with his  and entourageN The knight  redundantN So,  home, the  being  around castle wallsN In any case the rrival of cannon meant that castles woul d never again be impfnetrable. AE nd grew more pfaceful, a castle becamf m ore of a home and less of  aborate defences were usually more for s how than for NW emand for greater comfort, large manor h ouses NT les' of Henry VIII's reign were purfly ortresses; there were no domestic appart ments for a lord, his famhly and 
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:05/01 |B220D218<—17MakHis2|Y14TEXT|m428FF|s÷n1 ÷esfhold.  - 4 - FOLLOWUP WORK D  of the country, marEhng as maf8 castles N ghat is their geographical  tion? VN g—dn and why was it built? How has it D w a plan marking clearly the  nces, kfep, living quarters, etc.  Build a moddl of a well-ddfenddd castl e. U your model as an example, imagine  eithfr:-  to atdack the castle. How would you app roach  castle? What m ethods of attack would you usd? Name  all the weapons at your di sposal and describe how you  would use themN Make models or draw at least 2 of them. O
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:04/03 |B220E218 ÷e  ison of 30 men defending the castle.  How would you plan yo0r dffe nce? How would you prepare  yoursdlvfs for a long siege? g—at we apons would you use? D or ma£d models of at least 2 of them. 5 Re-enact a mediaeval tourn—ldnt w ith your class. D armour for yoursflf and for your horsfN D armour changdd during thd Middle  Ages. A cathedrals in your area where mediaeval I t them and copy their coats of  ms. D .   a squhpe, a lord's wife or his da ughter, and dfscribd your day in the for m of a diary. I e castle treas0rfr and draw up a bal
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:05/02 |B220F218 ÷eance shfet  , sTowing snder 'income' money earned fr om  axes, and under 'expenditure' the  cost of running the castle (food, cloth es, maintenance, etc) and  o thf king. R al banquetN Draw up a menu and a progra Mlf of  3 Write a poem or song about  pects of mediaeval life, eg  ing, courtly love, feasting, hunting ..N . RW Marshall (there is a good account of  his life in 'The Mediaeval Castle' b y Marjorie Reeves)N How does  compare with modern day hfroes?  M 5 - $HDE CHART: KEY EVENTS, AND RELEV ANT P2OGRAMME DA(DS TNC onquest FLC stle and motte at WW
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:04/10 |B2210218|a17MakHis2|i14TEXT|m4333D|s÷n1 ÷e I BLC ordered DB T omas Becket becomfs Archbishop of Canter bury. Stage set for  t King's power over Church (Henry II) 186 Hugh of Avalon becomes Bishop of L incoln BC ury CathedralN Later, pilgrimages bfgin . KJN  King John grants Magna Carta  Simon de Montfort takes Warwick Castle 1266 Simon de Montfort's Parliament 277 Edward I's first campaign in Wales EIS  Battle of Bannockburn E II makes Lincoln a 'Staple' town  Lincoln gets right to hold market. Edw ard III holds parliamdnt  1329 Thomas Beauchamp becomes 11th Ear l of Warwick HYW against the French begins B of Crecy (Edward HH0 Thomas Bea3ch|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:06/12 |B2211218|a17MakHis2|i14TEXT|m436A7|s÷n1 ÷eamp involvfd TBD ills about 1 in 3 of populationN Labour  W ill expanding BP (Edward HH0 W Staple fixed at Calais (Edward HH) GS ism beginsN One pope in A ignon. D hierarchy. TPR (Richard H( RB bfcomes 13th Earl of Warwick L coln bdcomds self-govdrning  M 6 -  Church unhty restordd F ebuilding of Lincoln Cathedral J oan of Arc capturfd and burnt at stakbN Stage set for ddcline E power in France. TW e Roses begin between Yorkists and Lanca strians JF up at Northleach C anding rapidly GS
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 21:04/14 |B2212218 ÷er and Thomas Betsof trading with merch ants from F TD Springd helps build Lavenham Church  83 King Richard III bechns late mediae val kfep at arwick KR III killed at Battle of Bosworth  - 7 - CLASS DADING T@ y selected to appeal to a rangd of abili ties and  GENERAL THE MEDIAEVAL WORLD J A P Bones (Maclhl lan E 1) THEMIDDLEAGE S J Nichnl & D Downton (Bashl  Blackwell 1981)  MEDIAEVAL LIFE (Focus on Hi1 tory) V Bailey & E Wise  (Longdan 1968)  THE MIDDLE AGES, BOOK 4, CAMBRIDGE INT2ODUCTION TO T HE HISTORY OF MANKIND ed T Cairns (C|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:04/00 |B2213218<—17MakHis2 ÷e U P 1972) MEDI AEVAL BRITAIN (Openings in History) R Un win H 981) P THEPEAS PEASANTS' REVOLT Mary Price (Longla n 1980) P THEME HE CASTLE M Reeves (Longf n 1963) EXPLORE A CASTLE Brian Davison (Hafhsh Hadhlton   THE CASTLE STORY Shehla M CASTLES A GUIDE FOR Y $NG PEOP THE MONASTERY (Reso0rce Unit) D Birt (L ongman THECHURCH  LEARNING IN MEDIA series) G Evans (Longd n 197 4)  THEMEDI
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:06/02 |B2214218|a17MakHis2|i14TEXT|m440E5|s÷n1 ÷eAEVAL MONASTERY M Reevfs (Longman 1982 ) MMEDIAEVALMED ICINE (History in Action Pack)  C Jordan and T fod (Edw in Arnold 1982)  ules UEA  P LINCOLNTHE gN Book) Dulcie Duke (CU P 1980) MDHEMED IAEVAL TOWN (Thfn and Thdre sfries)  M Reeves (Longlan 1 981)  THEMEDIAE (Lo.flan 1974) P me 5 THE STONERS (Fajhly Hi P J Fefferies (Nel3on 1978)  M MEDIAEVAL TRADE (The Way It Was) S Yaxle8  (Martins of Berwick 1977) 
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:00/01 |B2215218 ÷e M WOOL MERCHANTS OF THE 1 5TH CENTURY (Thfn and  There series) G Scott-Thomas (OP 1968) THEGUILD HALL, LAVENHAM, SUFFOLK (NatioN l Trust) RG rkshop Press 1983)  SHIPS AND VOYAGES (Resource Unit) J 1974)  - 8 - PLACESTOVISIT CASTLE S NORTHERNENGLANDACN thumbfrland; CarlYsle Castle; RC astle, North YorkshireN MIDLANDST shall CastleL Lincolnshire; Tamworth, St affs; Rocahngham, N SNDTHANDSM TH EAST: Bodiam Castle, Sussfx; Carisbrook e, Isle of Wight; LCK F ST AND SNTTH WEST: Corfe Castle, Dorset; Restormdl Castle, Cornwall; TC le, Devon. @LESBCA esey; Chepstow Castle; Cadrnarvon Ca|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:01/00 |B2216218447B9|snn1 ÷estle; C SCOTLANDSC e; Kildrully, nr Alford; $bntallon Castl e, East L NORTHERNIRELANDC ckfergus, Co Antrim; Dunclucf, Co Antrim , GCD THEMEDIAEVAL CHU CH NORTHERNENGLANDFA y; Rievatlx Abbdy, N Yorks; Lindisfarne Priory. MIDLANDSWPS gham Monastery, Lincolns(hpe. SOUTHAND SOUTH EAST: Great Coxwell Tithd Barn, Ox on; Waltham Abbey. D T AND SNDTH GEST: Bradford-on-Avon Tithf Barn; Buckfast Ab bdy; CP @LESSD d's Cathedral and Abbfy; Tintern Abbdy, Gwent. SCOTLANDDAM ose Abbdy; Cambuskenneth Abbey. NORTHERN IRELAND: Devenis— Island, Lower Lough E rnf, Enniskillen; inch ACD A rmagh Friary, Armagh; Dungiven Priory, L ondondfrry. TOWNSTRADEANDSNBHALLI FE NORTHERNENGLANDBMB ard Castle; R9fdale Folk Museum, H
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:10/12 |B2217218|a17MakHis2 ÷eton-le Hopf; Keep Musdum, Newcastle; Y housd Musdum of Bualding and Co1ntr8 Lif e, Aston Munslow; CMN @—l2 Castle Museul, D4rham. SN TH AND SO UTH EAST: Weald and Downland Open Air Mu seum, Chichester; RME is— Rural Life; Saffbon alddn M5rdum. FST AND OUT@ D T: Salisbury MusduD Sh erbobne Museum; Dreas1rer's HI sddr. ALES: St Fagan's Folk Musdum, Car diff; Merchant's Housd, dnby. SCOTLAND Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Gla sgow; Invfrness Museum; NM of Antiquitids, Edinburg—. NOTHERNIRELA ND: Ulster Museum, Belfast.   ####################################### MAKINGHISTORYT contains only BBC copyright HEM DDLE AGES material: its contents m|c
P722 CEEFAX 722 Wed 27 Jan 20:59/31 |B2218218|a17MakHis2|i14TEXT|m44E8D|s÷n1 ÷eay bf copied or reproduced  in schools and colleges with out further permission. N Printed and published at the rep ufst of the School  Broadcasting Council for thf UK by BBC Books, a  n of BBC Enterprises, Woodlands, 80 Wood LLW 0TT SPRINGF hfd 1983 BBCE terprises 1987 I SBN 0 563 340444 #################### ######################################## ##############  - 10 - 