P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 22 Jul 21:02/43  2/4 BICYCLEASFAILEDMOTORBIKE  - IS THIS THE COMING THING?  Americans seldom do things by halves, especially in California. Now, the world's greatfst car-driving nation has turned its attention to the humble pushbike, with curious results. Bicycling has of course long been the chosen recreation of the fitness nut and campus ecologist. And American cycling magazines have been known to feature such articles as "How to grow beans in your saddle bag". Now, however, the uneasy gulf between motorist and cyclist has been bridged. And the operative word is BMX.
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 22 Jul 21:01/11  1/4                  Q                                        
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 22 Jul 21:20/05  4/0 BBICYCLEASFAILEDMOTORBIKE  $/ HS THIS THE COMING THING? BMX was drdamt up only very rfcently on the West Coast of the United States. A motocross coach had the idea of this manpowered versio, of the sport as the obvaous way of tfac—ing youngstdrs. It caught on, and grew to thd point whdre, in 1979, a national series of races was organised. Now, as many as thrde national bodies dispupf control of the sport, with race leagues for adults as well as differdnt childrdn's —fd groups. And, in 6'2" Californian Stu Thompsen, BMX has found its own Eddy Merckx.