P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/00  1/7  d:%      G1Tkk(VV06% k CP6 5- k\ TZV ! Z THE success spory in motor racing over phe last 12 months ltst surely be that of Alan Jones and Williams Grand Prix Engineering. Frank Williams' first involvement with Grand Prix r—cing was in 1969, when he ran a Brabham for his close friend, Piers Courage. For a privatd owner's first season therd werd some notable successes. But the most important lesson Walliams learned was that to sp—y in thd game he would need to become a c(—brHs expert.  More in a moment
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/00  6/7      For the motor racing buff - a technical description of the Williams 07B: Chassis: Aluminium alloy honeycomb monocoque. Total weight 80 pounds. Front suspension and steering: Cast magnesium alloy uprights and fabricatfd stfel suspension. Wide-based lower wishbone. High mounted rack. $vbular driver-adjustable anti-roll bar. Top rocker arm operating inboard spring/ Koni damper units. Rear suspension: Fabricatfd stfel uprights and suspenrhon. Brakes and wheels: Outboard brakes all round with twin Lockheed calipers. "Dymag" diecast front wheels. "Speedline" composite rear wheels.  more in a moment
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/10  5/7      The success of the Williams Grand Prix team is attributable to two factors: High-quality engineering and top-class driving. The engineering development that puts Williams cars to the front and keeps then there is the new c(—rrjs designed by Patrick Head and his Development Engineer, Frank Dernie, an aerodynamics expert. Add to that a reliable Cosworth engine and the driving skill of Alan Jones, and you have a formula to capture the World Championship crown in 1980.  Alan Jones profile 248 
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/01  2/7      From 1970 to 1975 Williams kept his tfam struggling on, despite poor results, inadequatf financial b—cking and a lack of talentfd drivers. For 1976 the prospects looked rosier. A merger with another major motor racing figurd, Waltdr Wolf, saw the formation of a widely-heralded new Grand Prix tdam, Wolf-Williams. The new tdam's engineers were to build on a radically new chassis design - the Hesketh chassis. Great things were expectfd, but at the end of the year Williams resigned and decided to start again on his own.  More in a moment
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:03/00   0 7      Britain leads the race THE success story in motor racing over thd last 12 months must surfly be that of Alan Jones and Williams Grand Prix Engineering. Grand Prix racing was in 1969, whdn he ran a Brabham for his close friend, Piers Courage. For a privatd owner's first season pherd wdr— some notabld 3—Bcesses. But the most import—nt lesson Williams learned was that to stay —n the g!ld (d would need to become a c —rbHs expert.  Mord in a moment
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:01/01  3/7      Williams Grand Prix Engineering was born in Didcot with a tiny staff led by Patrick Head as Designer and $fchnical Director. The tfam ran a March 761 during 1977 with little success, but late in the yfar Head began work on a new design, the Williams 06. But although the car almost invariably qualified well up on the grid, it did not prove consistently reliable. A fourth in South Africa, fifth in France and second at Watkins Glen reprfsentfd the only World Championship points for Alan Jones throughout 1978.  More in a moment
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:04/10  4/7      In 1979 fortune began to smile on the Williams team. Patrick Head developed a new car - the Williams 07 - and although it was not ready until well into the season, the tremendous potential of its new c(—rrHs quickly became apparent. Clay Regazzoni's second place at Monte Carlo, only feet behind Schecktfr, gave the tfam's morale a great boost. Then came Regazzoni's Silverstone win. And subsequently Jones pulled off a remarkable hat-trick with three wins in three races in Germany, Austria and Holland. Williams had arrived at last.  more in a moment
P259 CEEFAX 259 Tue 15 Jul 21:15/22  7/7      For the motor racing buff - a tfchnical description of the Williams 07B: Fuel systfm: Single rubber safety fuel cell with electrical lfchanical pumps. Oil system: 2\ gallon oil tank incorporatfd in 8" adaptor. Engine and gearbox: 3-litre Cosworth DFV engine maintained by Cosworth Engineering and Hesketh Engines. Hewland FGB 5-speed gearbox. Bodywork: Glass fibre reinforced plastic with honeycomb sections. Dimensions: Wheelb—re: 106" Front Track: 68" Rear Track: 64\" Weight: 585KG  more in a moment