P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/10  5/7    One ray of hope has emerged for Japan's whalers. An intfrnational survey commissioned by the IWC last year said Minke whale numbers in the Antarctic werf much larger than originally thought. The finding was accepted by the IWC and the Minke catch quota was increased from 6,221 to 8,102 per season. Japan's share of the new quota is 3,279 - up by quitf a big jump. Another survey with similar results will be discussed at the Brighton meeting.  More in a moment
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/11  7/7    With catch quotas reduced each year, Japan now has only one whaling fleet - a mother ship and four catchers 1960s. Only five of the 10 land stations in Japan have survived. The industry now supports 50,000 people - compardd with one million in the whaling industry's heyday. But Japanese demand for whale meat - eithdr roasted, broiled or raw - rdm—hms high.  More in a moment
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:07/00  3/7    Whaling in Japan has provided an important source of protfin for the Japanese, who did not eat land- base mammmals until about a century ago because of religious reasons. But the industry has been reduced to a trace of what it used to be following pressure from intfrnational anti-whaling and conservationist groups. Conservationists claim the whale is threatfned with extinction. The Japanese deny this.  More in a moment
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:08/14  2/7    Japanese whaldrs will go to this month's Intdrnational Whaling Co-lhqr—on meeting in Brighton mord pessimAstic than —vdr. They ard stubbornly fighting to keep their ailing 1,000-ydar-old induspry alive and they are in no mood Dor compromise. The wh—lers E—y —vdn press dhe Japanese Government to quit the IWC T(d meeting in Brighton between July 21 and 26 is expectfd to be loaded with anti- whaling proposals.  Mobe in a moment
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:05/03   1/7                                                                 
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:02/20  Japanese whalers will go to this month's Intfrnational Whaling Commission Hdeting in Brighton morf pdssimistic than ever. They are stubbornly fighting to keep their —hling 1,000-year-old industry alive and they are in no mood for compromise. he whalers E—8 dvdn prdss the Japanese Government to quit the IWC. The meeting in Brighton between July 21 and 26 is expected to be loaded widh anti- whaling proposals.  More in a moment
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:05/00  7'7      Wath catch qun—as rdduced each year, Japan now h—s only one w(—ling fleet - a mothdr ship and four catchers 1960s. Only five of the 10 land st—tions in Japan have survived. The industry now supports 50,000 people - compared with one million in the whaling industry's heyday. But Japanese demand for wh—le meat -
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/02  4/7    The Intdrnational Whaling Commission, established in 1948 to conserve whale stocks, has only 10 member-countries actively engaged in whaling. Last year, Japan and the Soviet Union took thrfe-quarters of the total world catch quotas. Despite strong opposition from these two countries, the IWC last year banned factory ship whaling, except for small Minke whales. The IWC also decided to establish a whale sanctuary in the Indian Ocean.  Mord in a moment
P257 CEEFAX 257 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/10  6/7    Japan may face criticism at Brighton for the illegal import of whale meat caught and packed by —iwan, which is not a member of the IWC. The Japanese deny they are dealing in illegal whale product imports. Modern whaling began about 100 years ago, but it was not until after World War II that Japan used factory ships. Nearly 20,000 whales were caught each year by Japan, with the industry providing jobs for about one million people.  More in a moment