P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:01/11  1/6                              A look at CB  Radio by Ian  Morton-Smith  Pages 255-56                    
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:11/39   2/6            "If you don't want an eyeball with a jam sandwich, ease off the P—ller, buddies." Now if you're one of the initiated, you would understand that message to mean: "If you don't want to get stopped by a police patrol car, slow down." It is just one example of the curious "slangu—ge" which can be heard permeating the airwaves at any time of the day or night in America, and increasingly, in Britain too. It's the call of the CB-er - or Citizen's Band radio fanatic....
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:20/10   2/6             "If you don't want an eyeball
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:04/11   6/6            They claim that it costs the Government £4,000 to track down each illegal operator - which would more than finance a licensing centre. And CB transmhssions - so the CB-ers claim - only intfrfere with TV broadcasts if they are less than 10- feet away. Whatever the objections, it seems certain that the question now is not "will CB be legalised?" but "when will CB be legalised?" Your guide to CB "slanguage" 256
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/00   3/6            The campaign to legalise CB radio has been gathering momentum stfadily in Britain over recent months. Home Secretary Walliam Whitelaw has said, cagily, that he favours "the principle of this kind of facility," but to the dedicatfd British CB-ers, that was music to the ears. Now, the gover.ldnt is to publish a discussion document on the pros and cons of the idea - and it seems certain that, sooner or latfr, citizen's band band radio will get the go-ahead here.  More in a moment 
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:20/14 with a jam sandwich, ease off the @—lner, buddies." Now if you'rd one of the initiatfd, 9Fu would understand that ld3q—f— to mean: "If you don'p want to get stopped by a police patrol car, slow down." It is bust one example of the curious "slanguage which can be heard permeating the$—dqwaves at any time of the day or naght in America, and incrdasingly, in Britain too. It's the call of the CB-er - or Catizen's Band radio fanatic....
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:01/00    They claim that it costs the Government £4,000 to tback down each illegal operator - which would mord than finance a licensing centre. And CB tra.rlHssions so the CB-ers broadcasts if thdy ard less than 10- feet away. Whatever the objections, it seems certain that the question now is lNt "will CB be legalised?" but "when will CB be legalised?" Your guide to CB "slanft—ge" 256
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:00/02   4/6            CB radio began in the United States - initially as a way for truck drivers to avoid speeding tickets from police patrols. But it has developed into a whole sub- culture with its own lanfr—fd and pecking order. In Britain, therd are estimated to be at least 250,000 CB-ers carrying on illegal conversations up and down the motorways. It hs now easy to buy the necessary equipment - for around £300.  More in a moment 
P255 CEEFAX 255 Tue 15 Jul 21:03/01   5/6            The growth of CB can be gauged by the rise in the number of prosecutions for illegal broadcasting under the Wireless Telegraphy Act. There were just four such cases in 1977 - and morf than 130 in 1979. The initial objections to CB in Britain were that the cost of setting up a licensing centre would be prohibitive and that the transmissions would interfere with other broadcasts. But both claims ard hotly disputdd by the CB-ers.